SEMA Legislative Experts Discuss Status of RPM Act At PRI Trade Show | Performance Racing Industry
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SEMA Legislative Experts Discuss Status of RPM Act At PRI Trade Show
December 8, 2016
The Recognizing the Protection of Motorsports Act was introduced in 2016 to clarify that it is legal under federal law to modify the emissions system of a vehicle that's converted for race use only.
SEMA Legislative Experts Discuss Status of RPM Act At PRI Trade Show

SEMA legal experts Steve McDonald, Stuart Gosswein, and Russ Deane provided an update on the status of the Recognizing the Protection of Motorsports (RPM) Act before assembled press Thursday at the Performance Racing Industry (PRI) Trade Show in Indianapolis.
 
"We are in the process of working with RPM Act sponsors to have the bill introduced in early 2017," said McDonald, SEMA vice president of government affairs. "We believe this is an important opportunity for the newly elected administration and Congress to show that Washington can work effectively together to protect American manufacturing businesses."
 
In 2015, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a new interpretation of the Clean Air Act, which was enacted 46 years ago, asserting that it is illegal to convert a motor vehicle into a race car if the vehicle’s emissions system no longer remains in its certified configuration.
 
In response to this new interpretation, the RPM Act was introduced to clarify that it is legal under federal law to modify the emissions system of a motor vehicle that is converted for race use only. If passed, the legislation will provide certainty to the race parts industry and help protect companies from EPA enforcement.
 
"Does the EPA have the right to regulate race cars and race parts? Until 2015, the answer was very clear: No," said Gosswein, SEMA senior director of federal government affairs. "Lawmakers understand that race car emissions are fairly minimal and that, in fact, race tracks are the test labs for high-performance parts."
 
The election of Donald Trump as the next president of the United States has given SEMA's legislative group greater confidence that the RPM Act will be more favorably received in 2017. While optimistic over working with the incoming administration, stakeholders nonetheless urged racing professionals - especially business owners - to continue reaching out to lawmakers when the bill is reintroduced in the new Congress.
 
"Have as many people as you can write letters to your members of Congress. We are still seeking additional members to be sponsors and co-sponsors of the RPM Act," said Deane, SEMA general counsel. "We're hopeful that if we can get it through Congress, then the president will sign it.
 
"We need people to visit with their lawmakewrs, call them, send them texts, write them emails," he continued. "All of these things add up, and they will pay attention to it."

For more information on the RPM Act, click here.