WEC Announces Eight-Race 2018-19 Calendar | Performance Racing Industry
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WEC Announces Eight-Race 2018-19 Calendar
September 5, 2017
The ‘super season’ will see the championship achieve its long-held goal of finishing at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, with two visits to the Circuit de la Sarthe scheduled in the campaign; Sebring returns to the schedule as part of a double-header weekend in March 2019.
WEC Announces Eight-Race 2018-19 Calendar

The FIA World Endurance Championship will return to Sebring International Raceway in 2019 as part of a new winter calendar set to come into force next year.

Featuring eight races across 18 months, the 2018-19 WEC ‘super season’ will see the championship achieve its long-held goal of finishing at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, with two visits to the Circuit de la Sarthe scheduled in the campaign.

The six-hour race at the Circuit of The Americas in Austin, Texas, has been cut, as have the Silverstone, Nürburgring, Mexico City and Bahrain events from the existing nine-race schedule.

Having hosted the inaugural WEC race back in 2012, Sebring returns to the calendar as part of a double-header weekend that will see a 12-hour event run directly after the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship’s own race.

2018-2019 FIA World Endurance Championship Provisional Calendar

1. 4-5 May – WEC 6 Hours of Spa-Francorchamps (BEL)

2. 16-17 June – 24 Hours of Le Mans (FRA)

3. 13-14 October – 6 Hours of Fuji (JPN)

4. 3-4 November – 6 Hours of Shanghai (CHN)

5. February 2019 – Place and event TBC

6. 15-16 March 2019 – 12 Hours of Sebring (USA)

7. 3-4 May 2019 – WEC 6 Hours of Spa-Francorchamps (BEL)

8. 15-16 June 2019 – 24 Hours of Le Mans (FRA)

Officials from the FIA and the ACO also confirmed tweaks to the regulations for LMP1 from 2018 in reaction to Porsche’s decision to quit the class at the end of the season, the aim being to stimulate more interest from manufacturers to join Toyota in the category.

Following are the planned changes:

• From 2018-2019, and in the future, there will only be one category (and consequently one classification) in LMP1.

• To make it as accessible as possible to join this category from the 2018-2019 season onwards, the level of performance of the current non-hybrid LMP1 regulations managed via equivalence of technologies will be aligned with the current LMP1 hybrid regulations.

• Each competitor entered in LMP1 will have the same potential of performance independent of the type engine power used. Very clearly there will always be a slight advantage for the hybrid engine in terms of autonomy related to lower fuel consumption.

• There will be no changes made to the current chassis regulations (only LMP1 chassis will be eligible) but to facilitate the access to LMP1, more choice and engine power options will be offered. Depending on the selected criteria, an Equivalence of Technology will be implemented between turbo compressed and normally aspirated engines (as done in the past between petrol and diesel).

• All these decisions will apply for the next two seasons.

“Other regulatory decisions, which are still being finalized, will be announced later on covering areas such as a reduction in the number of private tests and collective tests proposed,” according to a statement from the series.

“The 2020 LMP1 regulations will be substantially altered as compared to the model presented during the last 24 Hours of Le Mans.”